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History of Fourth of July

One of the most celebrated days of the summer in the United States is the 4th of July. To many Americans, this day is celebrated by having a BBQ, watching fireworks, and spending time with loved ones. During these festivities, however, it is important to take time to understand the true meaning behind this date and what it stands for. The meaning of the 4th of July is a very important one to American history and should be remembered by all.

History of 4th July
"Philadelphia Fireworks Display 2014" by Kamil Dziedzina is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Independence Day

The history of the 4th of July stems back to the colonial times when America was still ruled by Great Britain. The Thirteen Colonies that would eventually form the United States of America rebelled against the tyranny in England and wanted their independence.  This day is referred to as Independence Day because on July 4, 1776 the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, declaring themselves independent from Great Britain. This document was drawn up by five members of this congress with the principal author being Thomas Jefferson.

After the Declaration of Independence was signed and delivered to the King of England, the Revolutionary War broke out and it would take six years of fighting for America to finally gain its undisputed freedom from Britain. America’s triumph over Great Britain shocked the world and established America as a force to be reckoned with.

Why We Still Celebrate Today

Americans still celebrate the 4th of July today because the Second Continental Congress was declaring more than just political freedom from Great Britain. The Declaration of Independence founded a nation that was based on basic human rights and equality for humankind under its laws. It was the first document of its time and laid the foundation for the moral standard that the United States strives to uphold. Celebrating Independence Day is not only about appreciating the freedom that the founding fathers gave America, but also understanding its impact on the country, and the world, today.

There are many ways to celebrate the 4th of July, so whether you’re grilling outside or watching fireworks with your family, keep in mind the true meaning of this holiday. The ability to celebrate your freedom is just another reminder of the impact of the Declaration of Independence and its influence not only in the United States, but around the world. So enjoy time with friends and family and celebrate this great and free nation, while always remembering those who fought to protect it.

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